Quentin Jenkins

Institution: Pitzer College

FROM DIVERSITY TO INCLUSION, A CRITICAL RACE ANALYSIS OF INSTITUTIONAL INCLUSIVITY: HOW HAVE PWIs BEEN AT PROMOTING DIVERSITY & BEING INCLUSIVE TOWARDS BLACK & LATINX STUDENTS?

Power point presentation and research paper

​Most students of color that attend predominantly white institutions (PWI) are usually from urban neighborhoods or under-represented neighborhoods on these campuses. (Primm, 2019). Students of color must also come to terms with the feeling of not belonging on top of the rigorous course load. Having students that come from similar backgrounds can help other students of color feel more supported, but in what ways do these colleges reach out to those students, and provide them with on-campus resources? Diversity, which one assumes is the goal of these PWI, can be measured in multiple ways. Conventional measurements are convenient: determine the percentage of Black and Latinx students at these colleges compared to the college population. Understanding that conventional measurements are an easy way to measure diversity, yet, also highlights the fact that numbers do not tell you the full story. An important aspect involves the question of inclusion. ​Inclusion, while they may be closely related, is a separate concept from diversity. Inclusion in academia is when all individuals are treated fairly and with respect, have equal access to opportunities and resources, and thoughts and ideas are valued inside and outside the classroom. ​In their attempt to recruit under-represented minorities these colleges provide good financial aid packages, as well as partnering with college access programs like Posse and Questbridge. Yet, the question of what happens when the students get on-campus remains largely unanswered. Do they feel like they are included? Do they feel safe on campus? These are key questions to ask when assessing inclusion. The “conventional measurement” of diversity can be accessed through existing data, typically collected by the college. The expected results of this project would be that each year these colleges tend to get better at admitting more Black and Latinx students through their partnerships with college access programs. The presence of affinity groups on campus such as the Black Students Union and Latinx Students Union can extend diversity to inclusion. Inclusive spaces provide minority students the opportunity to be surrounded by people who look like them and who can relate to them.

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